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Workroom is now open! Come down to No Vacancy Gallery in QV everyday until Sunday the 16th of December to witness the inspired creativity of our graduates! In addition, an amazing film was made to showcase the technical prowess that goes into making a knitted, woven or printed textile. Many thanks to a + b = c, Tim Harvey, RMIT Link Arts & Culture and Elise Cakebread for making this video possible.

Annick Akanni
Describe some common themes in your work:
Culture and textile traditions like hand-weaving, natural dyeing, beadwork along with personal narrative or storytelling are themes that I like to communicate through my work. Discovering the beauty of imperfections through architecture, home interiors and antiques. Handcrafted aesthetic, craftsmanship, hand manipulated surfaces, tactility, layers and volume.
What are you majoring in and why?
I major in weave and I chose this because it expresses my style and personality. I’ve always been a very hands on person, so this discipline is something that follows on with that idea. I’m able to be experimental, creative and innovative by having the ability to use a range of mixed media and surfaces  - embracing tradition but giving it a fresh and modern interpretation.

Links:
Annick’s WebsiteAnnick’s Twitterannick_akanni@yahoo.com.au

Annick Akanni

Describe some common themes in your work:

Culture and textile traditions like hand-weaving, natural dyeing, beadwork along with personal narrative or storytelling are themes that I like to communicate through my work. Discovering the beauty of imperfections through architecture, home interiors and antiques. Handcrafted aesthetic, craftsmanship, hand manipulated surfaces, tactility, layers and volume.


What are you majoring in and why?

I major in weave and I chose this because it expresses my style and personality. I’ve always been a very hands on person, so this discipline is something that follows on with that idea. I’m able to be experimental, creative and innovative by having the ability to use a range of mixed media and surfaces  - embracing tradition but giving it a fresh and modern interpretation.


Links:

Annick’s Website
Annick’s Twitter
annick_akanni@yahoo.com.au

Edith Barrett
Describe your workroom:
It very much reflects the projects I’m working on at the time, like a big working storyboard. I like, to be surrounded by my inspiration so it is often covered in a lot of exciting materials! Right now my desk and walls are covered in banksia cones, drawings, inks, fake grapes and the contents of our neighbours gardens. 
What inspires you as a designer?
So much! Animals and plants and people! I find it easy to find inspiration at so many things around me but what really excites me is being able to stop and breathe in a place of natural beauty. Studying in Uk and Estonia have also both been important influences in my work. But it is the aesthetic of my native Australian landscape that holds most intruige for me. I will never tire of a banksia’s little tufts and beaks, the dancing skirts of a snowgum’s bloom, or the bristly character of a bottlebrush.

Links:
Edith’s WebsitePinkey Square Websiteedithrewabarrett@gmail.com

Edith Barrett

Describe your workroom:

It very much reflects the projects I’m working on at the time, like a big working storyboard. I like, to be surrounded by my inspiration so it is often covered in a lot of exciting materials! Right now my desk and walls are covered in banksia cones, drawings, inks, fake grapes and the contents of our neighbours gardens.
 

What inspires you as a designer?

So much! Animals and plants and people! I find it easy to find inspiration at so many things around me but what really excites me is being able to stop and breathe in a place of natural beauty. Studying in Uk and Estonia have also both been important influences in my work. But it is the aesthetic of my native Australian landscape that holds most intruige for me. I will never tire of a banksia’s little tufts and beaks, the dancing skirts of a snowgum’s bloom, or the bristly character of a bottlebrush.


Links:

Edith’s Website
Pinkey Square Website
edithrewabarrett@gmail.com

Elise Cakebread
What are you majoring in and why?
For me choosing to major in knit was a no-brainer. Getting to make wooly creations on a yellow machine designed by a Swiss man in the 40’s sold it to me! Not to mention an excuse to visit Yarn Barn on a weekly basis. 
Describe your workroom:
Even though I am lucky enough to how have my own little workroom at home I tend to abuse the privilege by littering it with cut-up magazines, fabric scraps, cold cups of tea, confetti, twine, homeless knitting needles and pencil sharpenings. Multi-coloured tumbleweeds of yarn even blow through from time to time.
Links:
Elise’s Websitee.cakebread@gmail.com

Elise Cakebread

What are you majoring in and why?

For me choosing to major in knit was a no-brainer. Getting to make wooly creations on a yellow machine designed by a Swiss man in the 40’s sold it to me! Not to mention an excuse to visit Yarn Barn on a weekly basis.
 

Describe your workroom:

Even though I am lucky enough to how have my own little workroom at home I tend to abuse the privilege by littering it with cut-up magazines, fabric scraps, cold cups of tea, confetti, twine, homeless knitting needles and pencil sharpenings. Multi-coloured tumbleweeds of yarn even blow through from time to time.

Links:

Elise’s Website
e.cakebread@gmail.com

Loredana Camarata
What tools and techniques are you drawn to using in the studio?
I really love illustration and creating patterns from line work and mark making using fine liners and pacer pencils. When in the screen print studio Im always drawn to fabrics such as wool and silk and predominately use dying techniques to keep the beautiful handle of the fabric, I also always try to add more to the surface design, by playing with the dimension of the fabric, such as embroidery, embellishment, pleating and other fabric manipulation.
How do you begin a new project?
I will always start a new project or brief with research, learning more about it and gathering inspiration and reference imagery. I like to surround myself with inspiration to begin my design process, exploring possibilities and directions. This almost always begins with a hand made mark, with a pencil or pen, sketching and experimenting with marks, shapes and lines before taking it further to a final design, combining hand marks with CAD techniques.
Links:
Loredana’s WebsiteLoredana’s Blogloredanacamarata@gmail.com

Loredana Camarata

What tools and techniques are you drawn to using in the studio?

I really love illustration and creating patterns from line work and mark making using fine liners and pacer pencils. When in the screen print studio Im always drawn to fabrics such as wool and silk and predominately use dying techniques to keep the beautiful handle of the fabric, I also always try to add more to the surface design, by playing with the dimension of the fabric, such as embroidery, embellishment, pleating and other fabric manipulation.

How do you begin a new project?

I will always start a new project or brief with research, learning more about it and gathering inspiration and reference imagery. I like to surround myself with inspiration to begin my design process, exploring possibilities and directions. This almost always begins with a hand made mark, with a pencil or pen, sketching and experimenting with marks, shapes and lines before taking it further to a final design, combining hand marks with CAD techniques.

Links:

Loredana’s Website
Loredana’s Blog
loredanacamarata@gmail.com

Anita Chew
When did your interest in textiles begin?
I can’t remember I time in my life when I didn’t have some little ‘project’ on the go. It started with cross-stitch as a child and has since developed into a career. I have no doubt that it comes from the elder women in my life, who knit, weave, crochet, quilt etc.  
Describe some common themes in your work:
The idea of ‘glocal’ (global vs local) is a key trend that has influenced my work in the last year. In different ways, I’ve looked at cultural identity and how important is now and in the future as globalisation takes place. The idea that cultural clash undermines the identities involved is a key aspect as well as the resurgence of cultural heritage as global instability makes us turn to comforting and stable past practices and aesthetics.  
Links:
Anita’s Websiteanita@tandeme.com.au

Anita Chew

When did your interest in textiles begin?

I can’t remember I time in my life when I didn’t have some little ‘project’ on the go. It started with cross-stitch as a child and has since developed into a career. I have no doubt that it comes from the elder women in my life, who knit, weave, crochet, quilt etc. 
 

Describe some common themes in your work:

The idea of ‘glocal’ (global vs local) is a key trend that has influenced my work in the last year. In different ways, I’ve looked at cultural identity and how important is now and in the future as globalisation takes place. The idea that cultural clash undermines the identities involved is a key aspect as well as the resurgence of cultural heritage as global instability makes us turn to comforting and stable past practices and aesthetics. 
 

Links:

Anita’s Website
anita@tandeme.com.au

The Design and PR team behind our graduate exhibition has been putting the finishing touches on our exhibition catalogue over the past few days and we are thrilled to announce that it has gone to press! We are looking forward holding a copy of this little beauty in our hands soon, at the opening night of Workroom next week.

The Design and PR team behind our graduate exhibition has been putting the finishing touches on our exhibition catalogue over the past few days and we are thrilled to announce that it has gone to press! We are looking forward holding a copy of this little beauty in our hands soon, at the opening night of Workroom next week.

Sophie Curtain
What are you majoring in and why?
I am a print major. It was a pretty easy decision for me as I enjoy any form of markmaking and I don’t mind getting a little messy in the process. There are so many markmaking techniques to explore in print, as well as the exciting science behind colour and dye work. I also appreciate the pace and immediacy of the print process, it’s so great to create an image in the morning , expose it to screen and be printing with it by the afternoon. 
What inspires you as a designer?
Colour, confidence, passion and the need to communicate with others. I am constantly inspired by those that are pushing what they love and expressing themselves in creative ways by finding new ways to see and think.
Links:
Sophie’s WebsiteSophie’s BlogFull Drop Co Websitehello@sophiecurtain.com

Sophie Curtain

What are you majoring in and why?

I am a print major. It was a pretty easy decision for me as I enjoy any form of markmaking and I don’t mind getting a little messy in the process. There are so many markmaking techniques to explore in print, as well as the exciting science behind colour and dye work. I also appreciate the pace and immediacy of the print process, it’s so great to create an image in the morning , expose it to screen and be printing with it by the afternoon.
 

What inspires you as a designer?

Colour, confidence, passion and the need to communicate with others. I am constantly inspired by those that are pushing what they love and expressing themselves in creative ways by finding new ways to see and think.


Links:

Sophie’s Website
Sophie’s Blog
Full Drop Co Website
hello@sophiecurtain.com

Tanya D’Souza
Describe some common themes in your work:
I enjoy exploring lots of different themes and concepts in my work but on a personal level, I find that my Indian heritage and inspiration drawn from Indian textiles and culture is often an underlying theme within my textile designs. 
Where do you see yourself in five years time?
In five years I hope to be designing for a living , visited at least five other countries  , gained a teaching qualification and most importantly I’d like to be as involved in and passionate about textiles as I’m now!

Links: 
Tanya’s WebsiteTanya’s Blogtanya.m.dsouza@gmail.com

Tanya D’Souza

Describe some common themes in your work:

I enjoy exploring lots of different themes and concepts in my work but on a personal level, I find that my Indian heritage and inspiration drawn from Indian textiles and culture is often an underlying theme within my textile designs.
 

Where do you see yourself in five years time?

In five years I hope to be designing for a living , visited at least five other countries  , gained a teaching qualification and most importantly I’d like to be as involved in and passionate about textiles as I’m now!


Links: 

Tanya’s Website
Tanya’s Blog
tanya.m.dsouza@gmail.com

Justine Devlin 
Describe some common themes in your work:
My biggest inspiration is culture and textiles from around th I am inspired by the world of textiles and the bold striking patterns that each culture and tradition represents. I love to work with colour, geometrics, pattern and a different variation of mixed media and materials. I am attracted to bold colours, graphics, hand drawn illustrations and graphic prints. My style is very two dimensional. When I design I have an end product in mind and a visualization of how a print could work in different markets and for different customers.
When did your interest in textiles begin?
When I started this course I really knew nothing about it, I fell into Textile Design by accident. I’ve always had a strong love for art and drawing, It has always been my passion. When I was in high school I realized I wanted to get into the design field but I did not know what course would be best for me. I did a Certificate IV in design and while I was doing that course I found my love for patterns, fabrics, texture and constructed textiles. Everything I learnt in that year led me to Textile Design and found that I loved it as it’s so broad and diverse, the possibilities are endless.
Links:
Justine’s Websitejustinedevlin90@gmail.com

Justine Devlin
 

Describe some common themes in your work:

My biggest inspiration is culture and textiles from around th I am inspired by the world of textiles and the bold striking patterns that each culture and tradition represents. I love to work with colour, geometrics, pattern and a different variation of mixed media and materials. I am attracted to bold colours, graphics, hand drawn illustrations and graphic prints. My style is very two dimensional. When I design I have an end product in mind and a visualization of how a print could work in different markets and for different customers.


When did your interest in textiles begin?

When I started this course I really knew nothing about it, I fell into Textile Design by accident. I’ve always had a strong love for art and drawing, It has always been my passion. When I was in high school I realized I wanted to get into the design field but I did not know what course would be best for me. I did a Certificate IV in design and while I was doing that course I found my love for patterns, fabrics, texture and constructed textiles. Everything I learnt in that year led me to Textile Design and found that I loved it as it’s so broad and diverse, the possibilities are endless.

Links:

Justine’s Website
justinedevlin90@gmail.com

Laura Dougherty
How do you begin a new project?
When given a brief I always begin with research. My process is always well researched so that the design outcome is well considered. My process begins with hand generated motifs and then it is always completed with the computer. Scanning in my initial drawings, textures and ideas I use the computer to complete repeats, build up layers, stories and meaning.
Describe your workroom:
Those who know me well know that my workroom is always messy! Amongst the mess, everything has a place - if I am looking for something I know exactly where to find it but I am sure no one else would be game to look! 

Links:
Laura’s WebsiteLaura’s Bloglaura.dougherty@mail.com

Laura Dougherty

How do you begin a new project?

When given a brief I always begin with research. My process is always well researched so that the design outcome is well considered. My process begins with hand generated motifs and then it is always completed with the computer. Scanning in my initial drawings, textures and ideas I use the computer to complete repeats, build up layers, stories and meaning.

Describe your workroom:

Those who know me well know that my workroom is always messy! Amongst the mess, everything has a place - if I am looking for something I know exactly where to find it but I am sure no one else would be game to look! 


Links:

Laura’s Website
Laura’s Blog
laura.dougherty@mail.com

Jessica Fitzgerald
Describe your workroom:
My workroom is a mess of materials. I tend to spread myself around my house with one room containing all my yarns and loom and anther room with a table of organized mess of paints, paintbrushes, impasto medium and paper. I also surround myself with fabrics of inspirations, either ones I have found that I like or prints of my own that I haven’t really had the chance to do anything with. 
What are you majoring in and why?
I major in weave. I chose weave because when else would I ever get the chance to learn how to weave fabric. It was a new technique I had never tried before coming to University and I really enjoy doing it.
Links:
jessica_fitz12@hotmail.com

Jessica Fitzgerald

Describe your workroom:

My workroom is a mess of materials. I tend to spread myself around my house with one room containing all my yarns and loom and anther room with a table of organized mess of paints, paintbrushes, impasto medium and paper. I also surround myself with fabrics of inspirations, either ones I have found that I like or prints of my own that I haven’t really had the chance to do anything with.
 

What are you majoring in and why?

I major in weave. I chose weave because when else would I ever get the chance to learn how to weave fabric. It was a new technique I had never tried before coming to University and I really enjoy doing it.

Links:

jessica_fitz12@hotmail.com

Alice Hargreaves
Describe your ultimate collaboration:
It’s a widely known fact that I’m slightly Gorman obsessed. I’d have to say that if I ever got the opportunity to design for Gorman it would be a dream come true. I have been inspired by fashion textiles since before I even knew what a textile designer was, so I think it makes the idea of a Gorman collaboration even more appealing. 
Describe your workroom:
Most of my work is done at the desk in my bedroom. Sometimes it feels like I don’t end up leaving my room for days, however I work well in this space and I like the set up I have. My small desk space has made me become a much more organised worker when I’m creating designs. I work best with a lot of natural light and when there is music playing in the background that I can listen to as I draw. I also surround myself with a lot of inspirational imagery and my desk’s shelves are full of little trinkets and treasures I have collected over the years. 
Links:
Alice’s Blogalice.a.hargreaves@gmail.com

Alice Hargreaves

Describe your ultimate collaboration:

It’s a widely known fact that I’m slightly Gorman obsessed. I’d have to say that if I ever got the opportunity to design for Gorman it would be a dream come true. I have been inspired by fashion textiles since before I even knew what a textile designer was, so I think it makes the idea of a Gorman collaboration even more appealing.
 

Describe your workroom:

Most of my work is done at the desk in my bedroom. Sometimes it feels like I don’t end up leaving my room for days, however I work well in this space and I like the set up I have. My small desk space has made me become a much more organised worker when I’m creating designs. I work best with a lot of natural light and when there is music playing in the background that I can listen to as I draw. I also surround myself with a lot of inspirational imagery and my desk’s shelves are full of little trinkets and treasures I have collected over the years.

Links:

Alice’s Blog
alice.a.hargreaves@gmail.com

Our last project hand in this year was the cause of much celebration and an impromptu ‘Class of 2012’ photoshoot at the Brunswick Green. Well done everyone on three crazy years!!

Our last project hand in this year was the cause of much celebration and an impromptu ‘Class of 2012’ photoshoot at the Brunswick Green. Well done everyone on three crazy years!!

Elysia Renee Herriot
Describe your workroom:
I currently work at home and the work spaces are spread across the house and interspersed with living spaces.  Put simply, my work room is anywhere that I have pencil and paper or a keyboard, it’s any moment where my mind is clear to explore and my hands are free to make. Most days my work room is limited to the hour in which my toddler naps. As most creatives realise though, at least half of the work goes on in the mind and that is running constantly no matter what I’m doing.  

What are some common themes that are recurring in your work?


Systems of making that mimic ecosystems - particularly by reclaiming waste; re-imagining folk motifs; the idea of decorative ‘plenty’ or abundance in spite of minimal possessions. 
Links:
Elysia’s Websiteelysiarenee@gmail.com

Elysia Renee Herriot

Describe your workroom:

I currently work at home and the work spaces are spread across the house and interspersed with living spaces.  Put simply, my work room is anywhere that I have pencil and paper or a keyboard, it’s any moment where my mind is clear to explore and my hands are free to make. Most days my work room is limited to the hour in which my toddler naps. As most creatives realise though, at least half of the work goes on in the mind and that is running constantly no matter what I’m doing.
 

What are some common themes that are recurring in your work?

Systems of making that mimic ecosystems - particularly by reclaiming waste; re-imagining folk motifs; the idea of decorative ‘plenty’ or abundance in spite of minimal possessions.
 

Links:

Elysia’s Website
elysiarenee@gmail.com

Workroom is now open! Come down to No Vacancy Gallery in QV everyday until Sunday the 16th of December to witness the inspired creativity of our graduates! In addition, an amazing film was made to showcase the technical prowess that goes into making a knitted, woven or printed textile. Many thanks to a + b = c, Tim Harvey, RMIT Link Arts & Culture and Elise Cakebread for making this video possible.

Annick Akanni
Describe some common themes in your work:
Culture and textile traditions like hand-weaving, natural dyeing, beadwork along with personal narrative or storytelling are themes that I like to communicate through my work. Discovering the beauty of imperfections through architecture, home interiors and antiques. Handcrafted aesthetic, craftsmanship, hand manipulated surfaces, tactility, layers and volume.
What are you majoring in and why?
I major in weave and I chose this because it expresses my style and personality. I’ve always been a very hands on person, so this discipline is something that follows on with that idea. I’m able to be experimental, creative and innovative by having the ability to use a range of mixed media and surfaces  - embracing tradition but giving it a fresh and modern interpretation.

Links:
Annick’s WebsiteAnnick’s Twitterannick_akanni@yahoo.com.au

Annick Akanni

Describe some common themes in your work:

Culture and textile traditions like hand-weaving, natural dyeing, beadwork along with personal narrative or storytelling are themes that I like to communicate through my work. Discovering the beauty of imperfections through architecture, home interiors and antiques. Handcrafted aesthetic, craftsmanship, hand manipulated surfaces, tactility, layers and volume.


What are you majoring in and why?

I major in weave and I chose this because it expresses my style and personality. I’ve always been a very hands on person, so this discipline is something that follows on with that idea. I’m able to be experimental, creative and innovative by having the ability to use a range of mixed media and surfaces  - embracing tradition but giving it a fresh and modern interpretation.


Links:

Annick’s Website
Annick’s Twitter
annick_akanni@yahoo.com.au

Edith Barrett
Describe your workroom:
It very much reflects the projects I’m working on at the time, like a big working storyboard. I like, to be surrounded by my inspiration so it is often covered in a lot of exciting materials! Right now my desk and walls are covered in banksia cones, drawings, inks, fake grapes and the contents of our neighbours gardens. 
What inspires you as a designer?
So much! Animals and plants and people! I find it easy to find inspiration at so many things around me but what really excites me is being able to stop and breathe in a place of natural beauty. Studying in Uk and Estonia have also both been important influences in my work. But it is the aesthetic of my native Australian landscape that holds most intruige for me. I will never tire of a banksia’s little tufts and beaks, the dancing skirts of a snowgum’s bloom, or the bristly character of a bottlebrush.

Links:
Edith’s WebsitePinkey Square Websiteedithrewabarrett@gmail.com

Edith Barrett

Describe your workroom:

It very much reflects the projects I’m working on at the time, like a big working storyboard. I like, to be surrounded by my inspiration so it is often covered in a lot of exciting materials! Right now my desk and walls are covered in banksia cones, drawings, inks, fake grapes and the contents of our neighbours gardens.
 

What inspires you as a designer?

So much! Animals and plants and people! I find it easy to find inspiration at so many things around me but what really excites me is being able to stop and breathe in a place of natural beauty. Studying in Uk and Estonia have also both been important influences in my work. But it is the aesthetic of my native Australian landscape that holds most intruige for me. I will never tire of a banksia’s little tufts and beaks, the dancing skirts of a snowgum’s bloom, or the bristly character of a bottlebrush.


Links:

Edith’s Website
Pinkey Square Website
edithrewabarrett@gmail.com

Elise Cakebread
What are you majoring in and why?
For me choosing to major in knit was a no-brainer. Getting to make wooly creations on a yellow machine designed by a Swiss man in the 40’s sold it to me! Not to mention an excuse to visit Yarn Barn on a weekly basis. 
Describe your workroom:
Even though I am lucky enough to how have my own little workroom at home I tend to abuse the privilege by littering it with cut-up magazines, fabric scraps, cold cups of tea, confetti, twine, homeless knitting needles and pencil sharpenings. Multi-coloured tumbleweeds of yarn even blow through from time to time.
Links:
Elise’s Websitee.cakebread@gmail.com

Elise Cakebread

What are you majoring in and why?

For me choosing to major in knit was a no-brainer. Getting to make wooly creations on a yellow machine designed by a Swiss man in the 40’s sold it to me! Not to mention an excuse to visit Yarn Barn on a weekly basis.
 

Describe your workroom:

Even though I am lucky enough to how have my own little workroom at home I tend to abuse the privilege by littering it with cut-up magazines, fabric scraps, cold cups of tea, confetti, twine, homeless knitting needles and pencil sharpenings. Multi-coloured tumbleweeds of yarn even blow through from time to time.

Links:

Elise’s Website
e.cakebread@gmail.com

Loredana Camarata
What tools and techniques are you drawn to using in the studio?
I really love illustration and creating patterns from line work and mark making using fine liners and pacer pencils. When in the screen print studio Im always drawn to fabrics such as wool and silk and predominately use dying techniques to keep the beautiful handle of the fabric, I also always try to add more to the surface design, by playing with the dimension of the fabric, such as embroidery, embellishment, pleating and other fabric manipulation.
How do you begin a new project?
I will always start a new project or brief with research, learning more about it and gathering inspiration and reference imagery. I like to surround myself with inspiration to begin my design process, exploring possibilities and directions. This almost always begins with a hand made mark, with a pencil or pen, sketching and experimenting with marks, shapes and lines before taking it further to a final design, combining hand marks with CAD techniques.
Links:
Loredana’s WebsiteLoredana’s Blogloredanacamarata@gmail.com

Loredana Camarata

What tools and techniques are you drawn to using in the studio?

I really love illustration and creating patterns from line work and mark making using fine liners and pacer pencils. When in the screen print studio Im always drawn to fabrics such as wool and silk and predominately use dying techniques to keep the beautiful handle of the fabric, I also always try to add more to the surface design, by playing with the dimension of the fabric, such as embroidery, embellishment, pleating and other fabric manipulation.

How do you begin a new project?

I will always start a new project or brief with research, learning more about it and gathering inspiration and reference imagery. I like to surround myself with inspiration to begin my design process, exploring possibilities and directions. This almost always begins with a hand made mark, with a pencil or pen, sketching and experimenting with marks, shapes and lines before taking it further to a final design, combining hand marks with CAD techniques.

Links:

Loredana’s Website
Loredana’s Blog
loredanacamarata@gmail.com

Anita Chew
When did your interest in textiles begin?
I can’t remember I time in my life when I didn’t have some little ‘project’ on the go. It started with cross-stitch as a child and has since developed into a career. I have no doubt that it comes from the elder women in my life, who knit, weave, crochet, quilt etc.  
Describe some common themes in your work:
The idea of ‘glocal’ (global vs local) is a key trend that has influenced my work in the last year. In different ways, I’ve looked at cultural identity and how important is now and in the future as globalisation takes place. The idea that cultural clash undermines the identities involved is a key aspect as well as the resurgence of cultural heritage as global instability makes us turn to comforting and stable past practices and aesthetics.  
Links:
Anita’s Websiteanita@tandeme.com.au

Anita Chew

When did your interest in textiles begin?

I can’t remember I time in my life when I didn’t have some little ‘project’ on the go. It started with cross-stitch as a child and has since developed into a career. I have no doubt that it comes from the elder women in my life, who knit, weave, crochet, quilt etc. 
 

Describe some common themes in your work:

The idea of ‘glocal’ (global vs local) is a key trend that has influenced my work in the last year. In different ways, I’ve looked at cultural identity and how important is now and in the future as globalisation takes place. The idea that cultural clash undermines the identities involved is a key aspect as well as the resurgence of cultural heritage as global instability makes us turn to comforting and stable past practices and aesthetics. 
 

Links:

Anita’s Website
anita@tandeme.com.au

The Design and PR team behind our graduate exhibition has been putting the finishing touches on our exhibition catalogue over the past few days and we are thrilled to announce that it has gone to press! We are looking forward holding a copy of this little beauty in our hands soon, at the opening night of Workroom next week.

The Design and PR team behind our graduate exhibition has been putting the finishing touches on our exhibition catalogue over the past few days and we are thrilled to announce that it has gone to press! We are looking forward holding a copy of this little beauty in our hands soon, at the opening night of Workroom next week.

Sophie Curtain
What are you majoring in and why?
I am a print major. It was a pretty easy decision for me as I enjoy any form of markmaking and I don’t mind getting a little messy in the process. There are so many markmaking techniques to explore in print, as well as the exciting science behind colour and dye work. I also appreciate the pace and immediacy of the print process, it’s so great to create an image in the morning , expose it to screen and be printing with it by the afternoon. 
What inspires you as a designer?
Colour, confidence, passion and the need to communicate with others. I am constantly inspired by those that are pushing what they love and expressing themselves in creative ways by finding new ways to see and think.
Links:
Sophie’s WebsiteSophie’s BlogFull Drop Co Websitehello@sophiecurtain.com

Sophie Curtain

What are you majoring in and why?

I am a print major. It was a pretty easy decision for me as I enjoy any form of markmaking and I don’t mind getting a little messy in the process. There are so many markmaking techniques to explore in print, as well as the exciting science behind colour and dye work. I also appreciate the pace and immediacy of the print process, it’s so great to create an image in the morning , expose it to screen and be printing with it by the afternoon.
 

What inspires you as a designer?

Colour, confidence, passion and the need to communicate with others. I am constantly inspired by those that are pushing what they love and expressing themselves in creative ways by finding new ways to see and think.


Links:

Sophie’s Website
Sophie’s Blog
Full Drop Co Website
hello@sophiecurtain.com

Tanya D’Souza
Describe some common themes in your work:
I enjoy exploring lots of different themes and concepts in my work but on a personal level, I find that my Indian heritage and inspiration drawn from Indian textiles and culture is often an underlying theme within my textile designs. 
Where do you see yourself in five years time?
In five years I hope to be designing for a living , visited at least five other countries  , gained a teaching qualification and most importantly I’d like to be as involved in and passionate about textiles as I’m now!

Links: 
Tanya’s WebsiteTanya’s Blogtanya.m.dsouza@gmail.com

Tanya D’Souza

Describe some common themes in your work:

I enjoy exploring lots of different themes and concepts in my work but on a personal level, I find that my Indian heritage and inspiration drawn from Indian textiles and culture is often an underlying theme within my textile designs.
 

Where do you see yourself in five years time?

In five years I hope to be designing for a living , visited at least five other countries  , gained a teaching qualification and most importantly I’d like to be as involved in and passionate about textiles as I’m now!


Links: 

Tanya’s Website
Tanya’s Blog
tanya.m.dsouza@gmail.com

Justine Devlin 
Describe some common themes in your work:
My biggest inspiration is culture and textiles from around th I am inspired by the world of textiles and the bold striking patterns that each culture and tradition represents. I love to work with colour, geometrics, pattern and a different variation of mixed media and materials. I am attracted to bold colours, graphics, hand drawn illustrations and graphic prints. My style is very two dimensional. When I design I have an end product in mind and a visualization of how a print could work in different markets and for different customers.
When did your interest in textiles begin?
When I started this course I really knew nothing about it, I fell into Textile Design by accident. I’ve always had a strong love for art and drawing, It has always been my passion. When I was in high school I realized I wanted to get into the design field but I did not know what course would be best for me. I did a Certificate IV in design and while I was doing that course I found my love for patterns, fabrics, texture and constructed textiles. Everything I learnt in that year led me to Textile Design and found that I loved it as it’s so broad and diverse, the possibilities are endless.
Links:
Justine’s Websitejustinedevlin90@gmail.com

Justine Devlin
 

Describe some common themes in your work:

My biggest inspiration is culture and textiles from around th I am inspired by the world of textiles and the bold striking patterns that each culture and tradition represents. I love to work with colour, geometrics, pattern and a different variation of mixed media and materials. I am attracted to bold colours, graphics, hand drawn illustrations and graphic prints. My style is very two dimensional. When I design I have an end product in mind and a visualization of how a print could work in different markets and for different customers.


When did your interest in textiles begin?

When I started this course I really knew nothing about it, I fell into Textile Design by accident. I’ve always had a strong love for art and drawing, It has always been my passion. When I was in high school I realized I wanted to get into the design field but I did not know what course would be best for me. I did a Certificate IV in design and while I was doing that course I found my love for patterns, fabrics, texture and constructed textiles. Everything I learnt in that year led me to Textile Design and found that I loved it as it’s so broad and diverse, the possibilities are endless.

Links:

Justine’s Website
justinedevlin90@gmail.com

Laura Dougherty
How do you begin a new project?
When given a brief I always begin with research. My process is always well researched so that the design outcome is well considered. My process begins with hand generated motifs and then it is always completed with the computer. Scanning in my initial drawings, textures and ideas I use the computer to complete repeats, build up layers, stories and meaning.
Describe your workroom:
Those who know me well know that my workroom is always messy! Amongst the mess, everything has a place - if I am looking for something I know exactly where to find it but I am sure no one else would be game to look! 

Links:
Laura’s WebsiteLaura’s Bloglaura.dougherty@mail.com

Laura Dougherty

How do you begin a new project?

When given a brief I always begin with research. My process is always well researched so that the design outcome is well considered. My process begins with hand generated motifs and then it is always completed with the computer. Scanning in my initial drawings, textures and ideas I use the computer to complete repeats, build up layers, stories and meaning.

Describe your workroom:

Those who know me well know that my workroom is always messy! Amongst the mess, everything has a place - if I am looking for something I know exactly where to find it but I am sure no one else would be game to look! 


Links:

Laura’s Website
Laura’s Blog
laura.dougherty@mail.com

Jessica Fitzgerald
Describe your workroom:
My workroom is a mess of materials. I tend to spread myself around my house with one room containing all my yarns and loom and anther room with a table of organized mess of paints, paintbrushes, impasto medium and paper. I also surround myself with fabrics of inspirations, either ones I have found that I like or prints of my own that I haven’t really had the chance to do anything with. 
What are you majoring in and why?
I major in weave. I chose weave because when else would I ever get the chance to learn how to weave fabric. It was a new technique I had never tried before coming to University and I really enjoy doing it.
Links:
jessica_fitz12@hotmail.com

Jessica Fitzgerald

Describe your workroom:

My workroom is a mess of materials. I tend to spread myself around my house with one room containing all my yarns and loom and anther room with a table of organized mess of paints, paintbrushes, impasto medium and paper. I also surround myself with fabrics of inspirations, either ones I have found that I like or prints of my own that I haven’t really had the chance to do anything with.
 

What are you majoring in and why?

I major in weave. I chose weave because when else would I ever get the chance to learn how to weave fabric. It was a new technique I had never tried before coming to University and I really enjoy doing it.

Links:

jessica_fitz12@hotmail.com

Alice Hargreaves
Describe your ultimate collaboration:
It’s a widely known fact that I’m slightly Gorman obsessed. I’d have to say that if I ever got the opportunity to design for Gorman it would be a dream come true. I have been inspired by fashion textiles since before I even knew what a textile designer was, so I think it makes the idea of a Gorman collaboration even more appealing. 
Describe your workroom:
Most of my work is done at the desk in my bedroom. Sometimes it feels like I don’t end up leaving my room for days, however I work well in this space and I like the set up I have. My small desk space has made me become a much more organised worker when I’m creating designs. I work best with a lot of natural light and when there is music playing in the background that I can listen to as I draw. I also surround myself with a lot of inspirational imagery and my desk’s shelves are full of little trinkets and treasures I have collected over the years. 
Links:
Alice’s Blogalice.a.hargreaves@gmail.com

Alice Hargreaves

Describe your ultimate collaboration:

It’s a widely known fact that I’m slightly Gorman obsessed. I’d have to say that if I ever got the opportunity to design for Gorman it would be a dream come true. I have been inspired by fashion textiles since before I even knew what a textile designer was, so I think it makes the idea of a Gorman collaboration even more appealing.
 

Describe your workroom:

Most of my work is done at the desk in my bedroom. Sometimes it feels like I don’t end up leaving my room for days, however I work well in this space and I like the set up I have. My small desk space has made me become a much more organised worker when I’m creating designs. I work best with a lot of natural light and when there is music playing in the background that I can listen to as I draw. I also surround myself with a lot of inspirational imagery and my desk’s shelves are full of little trinkets and treasures I have collected over the years.

Links:

Alice’s Blog
alice.a.hargreaves@gmail.com

Our last project hand in this year was the cause of much celebration and an impromptu ‘Class of 2012’ photoshoot at the Brunswick Green. Well done everyone on three crazy years!!

Our last project hand in this year was the cause of much celebration and an impromptu ‘Class of 2012’ photoshoot at the Brunswick Green. Well done everyone on three crazy years!!

Elysia Renee Herriot
Describe your workroom:
I currently work at home and the work spaces are spread across the house and interspersed with living spaces.  Put simply, my work room is anywhere that I have pencil and paper or a keyboard, it’s any moment where my mind is clear to explore and my hands are free to make. Most days my work room is limited to the hour in which my toddler naps. As most creatives realise though, at least half of the work goes on in the mind and that is running constantly no matter what I’m doing.  

What are some common themes that are recurring in your work?


Systems of making that mimic ecosystems - particularly by reclaiming waste; re-imagining folk motifs; the idea of decorative ‘plenty’ or abundance in spite of minimal possessions. 
Links:
Elysia’s Websiteelysiarenee@gmail.com

Elysia Renee Herriot

Describe your workroom:

I currently work at home and the work spaces are spread across the house and interspersed with living spaces.  Put simply, my work room is anywhere that I have pencil and paper or a keyboard, it’s any moment where my mind is clear to explore and my hands are free to make. Most days my work room is limited to the hour in which my toddler naps. As most creatives realise though, at least half of the work goes on in the mind and that is running constantly no matter what I’m doing.
 

What are some common themes that are recurring in your work?

Systems of making that mimic ecosystems - particularly by reclaiming waste; re-imagining folk motifs; the idea of decorative ‘plenty’ or abundance in spite of minimal possessions.
 

Links:

Elysia’s Website
elysiarenee@gmail.com

About:

RMIT BA Textile Design 2012 Degree Show